Episode Related Activities

Episode

101A: Going on an O Hunt

In “Runaway O”, the WordFriends™ have to find an “O” that is rolling through WordWorld. Here is a fun activity that you and your child can do to find “O”s in your home and neighborhood.

Related Episode:
101
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Recognizing the Letter O.
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • A piece of sturdy paper or poster board.
  • Scissors.

Directions:

  1. Cut the paper/poster board into the shape of the letter O. (Make one “O” for you and another for your child).
  2. Glue each “O” to a popsicle stick or hang the “O” on a strong piece of yarn and wear it like a necklace.
  3. Now go on a “hunt” to find “O”s in your home and community. Use your “O” necklaces/popsicle sticks to remind your child what the letter O looks like. Here are some ideas of things to do with your child on your hunt:
  • Look for things around the house and outside that are shaped like the letter O-Cheerios, donuts, tires, hula-hoops, designs, etc.
  • Look for the letter O in common signs in the neighborhood, such as “stop”, “slow”, “school”, “crossing”, “don’t walk”, “open”, “closed”, “on” and “off”, and in posters.
  • Look for things in your home that start with “O”, such as “oatmeal”, “olives”, “Oreos”, etc.
  • Look for the letter O in books that you read with you child.

Take It Further:

  • “O” Hide and Seek Make an “O” out of poster board (or other sturdy material). Take turns with your child to hide and find
    the “O” in your home. You can also play this game with multiple people, with one person hiding the “O” and the others finding it. When someone finds the “O,” he can say “O, O, I found the O.”
    Variation:
    Try playing this game with other letters of the alphabet.
  • “O” Concentration Game On rectangular (card-shaped) pieces of paper, draw or cut out images of things that look like an “O”-donuts, cheerios, tires, etc. Have two images/drawings of each object-for example, two tires, two donuts, etc. Have at least six objects (12 cards). On the back of each card, write the letter O. Mix up the cards and place them upside down (with the “O” face up and the images face down). Then flip over two cards to try to find matching objects. If they match, the player who found them puts them in her pile. If they don’t match, she turns them back over. The game continues until all matches have been found. For an easier version, play with the pictures facing up. Take turns finding pairs.
  • “O” Freeze Dance Turn on music for everyone to dance/move to. After a little while, stop the music and call out “O!” (You can also hold up a paper with the letter O on it as you say “O.”) Upon hearing “O,” all players have to quickly make an “O” with their hands, arms or other body parts and then freeze in place. When the music starts again, players can continue dancing/moving.
    Variation:
    Try playing this game as an alphabet freeze dance. Every time you stop the music, say another letter. The players then freeze in the shape of that letter.

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

101B: My Very Own Birthday Party Book

In “Happy Birthday, Dog,” the WordFriends™ plan a birthday party for Dog. In this activity, you and your child can create your own book with pictures of things that you can find at a birthday party.

Related Episode:
101
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Vocabulary Development, Printing practice.
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • Several pieces of paper that are the same size (8 ½ x 11 or smaller).
  • Markers or crayons to draw with and/or pictures from old magazines or newspapers.
  • Glue.
  • Stapler or yarn and hole puncher.

Directions:

  1. Brainstorm with your child to think of things that you can find at a birthday party. Write down each word on a separate piece of paper. Here are some suggestions of words to include in your book:
    • cake
    • hat
    • balloons
    • children
    • friends
    • family
    • gifts or presents
    • drinks
    • streamers
    • games
    • birthday card
  2. Have your child paste or draw a picture of that thing on the same page with the word that describes it. For some things, your child can actually paste the object onto the page. These things could include a party hat, paper cup, pictures of family and friends, a piece of a streamer and a birthday card. (Note: Do not include actual balloons in your book, as these can be a choking danger).
  3. Work with your child to create a cover for your book. The cover should include the title of the book and the name of your child, such as “My Birthday Party Book” by Jordan Smith. Your child can also draw and paste pictures on the cover to show that the book is about a birthday party.
  4. Place the cover on top of all of the pages and staple all the pages together OR punch a hole in the top left hand corner of each page and tie the pages together with yarn. Read your birthday party book with your child.

Take It Further:

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

102A: Find the Ant

In “There’s an Ant in Every Giant”, Ant turns into “Giant” by adding the letters “Gi” to his name. There are many words that have the word “ant” in them. In this fun activity, children listen for the hidden “ant” in different words.

Related Episode:
102
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Identifying Words within Words; Listening Skills.
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • One printout of the WordFriend™ Ant (see Appendix for a picture of WordFriend Ant).
  • Scissors.
  • Create “Find the Ant” word cards by writing several words that have “ant” in them on small cards (e.g. giant, antenna, plant, etc.). Also create several cards that do NOT include “ant” (e.g. shirt, lion, house, etc.). These will be mixed together for the game.
  • A small bag (or a hat or open box).

Directions:

  1. Place Ant WordFriend on the ground so that you can clearly see him.
  2. Move back, so that you and your child (and other players) are standing at least 15 feet away from Ant. (Make sure that everyone can see the word right side up, from left to right).
  3. Place the word cards you’ve made in the bag. Mix up the cards.
  4. Take turns with your child, and anyone else who is playing, to pick out a sheet of paper from the bag. Read each word out loud. If the word has “ant” in it, the player who pulled out the word moves forward one space. If the word doesn’t have “ant,” she stays still. If a child moves forward on a word without “ant”, have her go back to the spot where she started her turn. The game continues until everyone has reached Ant. Note: When saying an “ant” word, emphasize the “ant” part of the word, by saying it loudly and clearly.
  5. Play the game with some other small words (like “all” and “and”):
  • Getting Ready: Write down the small word (for example, “all” or “and”). Create more cards that have the word “all” or “and” in them, as well as words that don’t have these words in them. Here are some suggestions for words to use for “all” and “and”:
    • “all” words: basketball, baseball, tall, small, ball, call, overalls, mall, fall, hall, wall.
    • “and” words: candle, handle, sand, stand, handstand, understand, band, bandstand, candy, land, grand, hand.
  • Playing the Game: Repeat steps 1 to 3 in the section above. Instead of using the Ant WordFriend, put the new small word –”all” or “and” – on the ground. As your children play the game, have them listen for words with the new word in them (“all” or “and”). Note: For words that have the featured word two times like “handstand” and “bandstand” (which each have “and” two times), children can move ahead two spaces.

Take It Further:

Build an “ant” WordThing™ – Have your child make a WordThing with her favorite “ant” word. Write a word with “ant” in it, like “ant,” “antenna,” “pants,” “elephant,” etc. in big letters on a piece of construction paper or cardboard. (This works best with nouns, especially objects and animals.) Then have your child turn the word into a WordThing by drawing an outline of the object’s shape around it and decorating it by drawing, painting and/or pasting on objects (like pom poms, pipe cleaners, googly eyes, etc.).

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

102B: My Favorite Foods Book

In “Chef Sheep”, Pig and Sheep use a “Cookbooktionary” with pictures and words of the foods that they cook. In this activity, you can create your own food dictionary/picture book of the foods in your home.

Related Episode:
102
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Understanding How Print Works
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • Ten or more pieces of paper that are the same size (8 ½ x 11 or smaller).
  • Markers or crayons to draw with and/or pictures from old magazines or newspapers and glue.
  • Binder clip or yarn and hole puncher.

Directions:

  1. Go on a “scavenger hunt” in your kitchen with your child to find some of your favorite foods.
  2. On each piece of paper, write down the name of one of your favorites.
  3. Have your child draw or paste a picture of each food item above its word.
  4. Work with your child to create a cover for the book. The cover can include the title of the book and the name of your child. For example, “My Favorite Foods” by Susie Johnson. Your child can also draw and paste pictures on the cover to show that the book is about food.
  5. Attach the pages with a binder clip or make a hole in the top left hand corner of the pages and tie them together with yarn.
  6. Read your favorite foods book with your child.
  7. In the next few days and weeks, you can add new pages to your book. Just unclip or untie the pages to add a new page. Then put back the clip or tie the yarn to attach the pages.

Take It Further:

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

103A: Uppercase-Lowercase Matching Game

In “Rocket to the Moon”, Frog learns that both lowercase and uppercase letters can form words. This fun matching game helps children become familiar with letters in both uppercase and lowercase forms.

Related Episode:
103
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Matching Lowercase and Uppercase Letters
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • The same number of pieces of paper in two different colors (for example, ten red and ten blue). All pieces should be the same size and shape.
  • Pencil, pen, crayons or markers.

Directions:

  1. Select a few letters and draw their lowercase versions on sheets of paper (one letter per sheet). Try starting with the letters in your child’s name.
  2. Draw the uppercase forms of the same letters on pieces of paper that are a different color.
  3. Mix up the cards and place them upside down on the playing surface.
  4. Flip over one card of each color to try to match a lowercase letter to its corresponding uppercase letter. If they match, put them in your pile. If they don’t match, turn them back over.
  5. The next player then flips over one card of each color to try to find a match.
  6. The game continues until all matches have been found.
    Variation: For an easier version of the game, play with the letters facing up. Take turns matching the lowercase letters with their corresponding uppercase ones.

Take It Further:

  • Make a Magnet Help your child to choose a letter of the alphabet from a word that he knows well, such as his name, favorite food, favorite animal, etc. Work with your child to write the uppercase and lowercase versions of that letter on a sheet of sturdy paper. Attach flexible magnetic tape (found in craft stores) to the back of the paper to make your very own magnet.
    Variation:
    Another way to make a magnet is to reuse an old magnet that you don’t need. Paste paper on the front or paint the front of the magnet in white to create a blank art surface. Your child then can draw an uppercase and lowercase letter on the front. Make more magnets with other letters of the alphabet in both uppercase and lowercase forms.
  • Make a Bookmark Work with your child to choose a letter of the alphabet from a word he knows well. Write the letter in both uppercase and lowercase forms on a rectangular (bookmark-shaped) sheet of sturdy paper, poster board or cardboard. Have your child color and draw pictures of things that start with that letter on the other side of the bookmark. (For example, if you choose the letter D, your child could draw pictures of dinosaurs, dogs, donuts, doors, etc.). Use the bookmark as you read to your child.

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

103B: Build a WordThing™

In “The Birds”, the WordFriends™ explore the words “bird”, “egg” and “nest.” This fun activity encourages children to create their very own WordThings (objects that are made up of the letters that create their word) for the words shown in this episode.

Related Episode:
103
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Recognizing Words in Print; Vocabulary Development.
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • Construction paper, white paper, sturdy paper or cardboard.
  • Crayons, markers or pencils.
  • Twigs, feathers and other items to paste onto the WordThings.

Directions:

  1. Work with your child to create a WordThing for the word “bird”: Write “bird” in big letters on a piece of paper or cardboard. Draw and/or paste items around the letters to make the word look like a bird. For example, decorate the word with feathers and draw a head and feet onto the word and/or cut out wings (from paper, cardboard or other sturdy material) and glue them onto the word.
  2. Work with your child to create a WordThing for the word “nest”: Write the word “nest” on a sheet of paper. Decorate it by drawing a nest around it or adding things like twigs to create a nest.
  3. Work with your child to create a WordThing for the word “egg”: Cut a sheet of paper into an egg-shaped oval. Write the word “egg” inside the oval. Decorate with paint, markers, crayons, colored pencils, etc.
  4. Here are some suggestions of what you can do with your finished WordThings:
    • Attach tape to the back and hang them on the wall.
    • Attach magnetic tape to the back of the WordThings to make magnets.
    • Put a hole in the top of each of your WordThings to hang them for all to see.
    • Attach your WordT

Take It Further:

  • Bird, Egg, Nest Game Place the WordThings from the above activity onto the floor, spaced at least four feet apart from each other. Have your child/children walk around the room or dance to music. After a little while, shout out “bird,” “egg” or “nest.” All players then quickly go to WordThing corresponding to the word that the caller said. (For example, if you say “nest”, everyone goes to the sheet with the “nest” WordThing). After all children are standing next to the picture, they begin moving around the room again. After a little while, call out one of the three words. Children then quickly go to that word. Everyone can take turns being the caller.
  • Mommy/Baby Concentration Game Cut out pictures of adult animals and their babies, including an adult and baby bird and an adult and baby human. Paste the pictures on rectangular card-shaped poster board (or other sturdy material). Mix up the cards and play concentration-trying to match each baby to its adult.
  • Bird Watching JournalTake a blank notebook or staple several sheets of paper together (at the top left hand corner). This will be your bird journal. Go outside with your child to look for birds. Take photographs of the birds or draw pictures of them into your bird journal. On the cover, write the word “birds” and draw or paste pictures of birds.

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

104A: Looking for Pieces of Pie

In “The Mystery of the Disappearing Pie,” Sheep tries to find the pie that Pig made for Bear. In this fun activity, you can go on your own scavenger hunt to find a pie.

Related Episode:
104
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Recognizing that a word is made up of letters; Recognizing the word pie.
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • A sheet of paper with the letters P-I-E written on it.
  • Printout of the WordThing™ Pie (see Appendix).
  • Scissors.

Directions:

  1. Cut out the letters P-I-E so that each one is on a separate sheet of paper.
  2. Have one person hide the letters P-I-E and have the other players find the letters.
    Variation:

    • Have a different person hide each letter.
    • Have players work in teams to hide and find the letters.
  3. Once the players have found all three letters, say, “It’s time to build a word. Let’s build it. Let’s build it now!” Then put the letters in the order P-I-E and then read the word Pie.
  4. Then dramatically bring out the ie WordThing to show the word you just built and read it with your child.
    Variation:

    • Take turns hiding and finding the Pie WordThing.
    • Help your child to match the letters P, I, and E to the letters in the Pie WordThing.
    • Give your child hints to help him find the letters P-I-E. For example, if you hid the “P” near a couch, you could say, “The P is hiding near a place where we like to sit on when we are relaxing”.

Take It Further:

P-I-E Hunt Take one of the letters from the word P-I-E and go on a scavenger hunt in your home and neighborhood to find other words with that letter in them. Here are some ideas:
• Look for the letter in signs and posters in the neighborhood.
• Look for boxes and labels (of food, etc.) around the house with the letter in them.
• Look for the letters P, I and E and/or the word Pie in books that you read with your child.

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

104B: Rhyme Time

“Duck’s Family Reunion” introduces children to words that rhyme. Try this fun activity to help your child learn about rhyming.

Related Episode:
104
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Rhyming
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • Printouts of WordFriends™ Frog and Bug (see Appendix).
  • Index cards or sheets of paper that are all the same size and shape.
  • Pencil, pen, crayons or markers.
  • Three empty shoeboxes or other open boxes.
  • Tape.

Directions:

  1. Print and cut out the WordFriends.
  2. Tape each WordFriend to a shoebox or other open box.
  3. On separate sheets of paper or index cards, write words that rhyme with each character’s name. Brainstorm with your child to think of as many rhyming words as you can. Here are some suggestions:
    • Words that rhyme with Frog:fog, log, dog, hog, jog.
    • Words that rhyme with Frog:hug, dug, mug, jug, tug, rug, slug, snug.
    Variation: For an easier version of the game, draw a picture on the card with each word.
  4. Put all of the word cards into a bag and mix them up.
  5. Pull out a word from the bag and read it aloud with your child. Decide together which WordFriend it rhymes with. Then throw or place it into the shoebox with that WordFriend’s picture on it. For example, if you pull out the word “log”, throw it into the “Frog” box. If you get the word “jug”, put it in the “Bug” box, etc.
  6. Pull out words one at a time, taking turns with your child, until all the words have been chosen. Once all the words have been put into boxes, read the words in each box out loud and congratulate yourselves for putting all the words in the right boxes.

Take It Further:

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

105A: FISH-SH-SH-ing

In “SH-SH-Shark”, the WordFriends™ learn many new words with the “sh” sound. Discover “sh” words with your child with this fun “fishing” game.

Related Episode:
105
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
The “sh” sound.
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • Pieces of sturdy paper or poster board, all the same size and shape (like the size of playing cards).
  • Crayons, pencils, markers, and/or cutout pictures from old magazines or newspapers and glue.

Directions:

  1. Draw or paste some images of “sh” words, such as shark, shoe, fish, sheep, shell, shapes, shirt, ship and shelf-on pieces of paper or poster board. (As you are drawing or looking for images, say the words out loud with your child and help her to hear the “sh” sound in each one).
  2. Write the words for each object on other sheets of paper (one word per paper) that are the same size and shape as the cards with the “sh” words.
  3. Mix up all the items and put them into a bag.
  4. Pull out at a card from the bag. Put it down on the playing surface.
  5. Continue to pull out cards one at a time, taking turns with your child.
  6. If a player pulls out a card that matches one of the cards that is already out of the bag, she can put both cards in her pile.

Variation: Create a “fishing pole” using a popsicle stick and string. Put a hole through a small piece of paper and tie onto the string. Add magnetic tape to one side of the paper. Add magnetic tape to the back of each card. Place the cards into a bag. Take turns “fishing” in the bag with the “fishing pole” to get out the cards.

Take It Further:

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

105B: B-Charades

In “Dog Wants to Play Ball”, Dog uses different motions and gestures to get the other characters to guess what he wants. In this show, the characters guess many different words that start with the letter “B” before they guess the word “ball.” Try playing this fun charades game at home.

Related Episode:
105
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Recognizing the Letter “B”.
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • Rectangular pieces of cardboard or paper (all the same size and shape).
  • Photographs, pictures from old magazines, and/or drawings of objects that start with “B”.
  • Glue.

Directions:

  1. Draw or paste images of words that start with the letter B on the pieces of paper.
  2. Write the name of the object below the picture.Some objects could include:
    bread; banana; bagel; blueberry
    bib; binky; baby bonnet; bottle
    bubble; ball; blanket; bath
    boy; bus; bear; bird
  3. Put all the cards in a bag and mix them up.
  4. Pull out a card and use your hands, arms, body movements and facial expressions to try to get your child to guess the word on the card.
  5. Switch roles and try to guess the word your child selects.Note: This can either be done just through gestures or, for younger children, with words too. (For example, when describing a banana a child could say, “This is yellow and something that I like to eat for a snack”).Variation: Pick another letter of the alphabet with your child. Think of words that start with that letter. Follow the instructions 1-5 above to play charades with the new letter.

Take It Further:

  • Big “B” Collage Take a large piece of cardboard, poster board or other sturdy material and cut it into a “B” shape. Then draw or paste cutouts of the letter B (cut out from words in old papers, magazines, etc.) and place them all over the “B”.

Variation: Draw or paste objects that start with the letter B all over the “B.” Hang the “B” collage on the wall or hang with a piece of yarn.

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

106A: The Magic “S” Game:

In “Pies, Pies, Pies!”, Pig learns that he can turn one pie into many pies by adding the letter s at the end of the word “pie”. Try playing this game with your child and some of her friends for a fun and exciting way to explore how an “S” can turn words into plurals.

Related Episode:
106
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Recognizing the Letter “S”; Understanding Plural Words by Adding the Letter “S”.
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • Cards with pictures of animals and the name of the animal printed below the picture. (You and your child can make these cards by cutting out pieces of paper and pasting or drawing pictures of animals on the card and writing the name of the animal below the picture).Note: All animals selected must be ones whose names can be made plural by adding an “s” at the end. Some suggested animals are: cow; dog; cat; kangaroo; chicken, pig; frog; elephant; duck; bird.
  • A card with the letter s on it. (The letter s should be the same size as the letters on the animal cards).
  • Popsicle sticks (optional).
  • Wand or stick (optional).

Directions:

  1. Each player, except for one, holds one of the animal pictures in her hand. They can hold the cards facing out for everyone to see. The player who isn’t holding an animal card, holds the magic “S” card.Optional:
    • Glue the cards to popsicle sticks to make them easier to carry.
    • Place the “S” on a wand or stick, so that it looks like it’s on a wand.
  2. Every player except for the player with the magic “S” card walks around pretending to be the animal on her card, moving and sounding like that animal-mooing if she is a cow, quacking if she is a duck, etc.
  3. One player walks around the group carrying the magic “S” card. Whenever the magic “S” player decides, he stands next to the end of the word on one of the players cards (the cow, for example) with the magic “S” card and says “Cows, cows, come out and play!”
  4. All the other players then have to go and stand by the chosen player and pretend to be that animal. After a little while, the person with the magic “S” gives the magic “S” to the chosen player and the chosen player gives her card to the person who had the magic “S.” Then the players continue around and the new magic “S” holder gets to choose someone else.

Take It Further:

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

106B: Mixed up Magnets

In “Waterlogged”, every time the ants pull out the letters L-O-G from the water, they think they have pulled out the wrong letters, since they are not in the right order to form the word log. Try this activity to have fun scrambling and unscrambling the names of some WordFriends™.

Related Episode:
106
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Learning the importance of letter order; Identifying the sounds of letters.
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • Pieces of paper.
  • Pen, pencil or crayons.
  • Scissors.
  • Magnetic Tape.

Note: Instead of making magnetic letters with the materials above, you can also play this activity with magnetic letters that you may already have in your home.

Directions:

  1. Write down the name Frog on a sheet of paper. (Make sure to make spaces between the letters.) Note: If using pre-made magnets, find the letters F-R-O-G and skip to Step 4.
  2. Cut out the letters in the word Frog so that each letter is on a separate sheet of paper.
  3. Put magnetic tape on the back of each letter.
  4. Make the word Frog with your letters. Then move one letter in the word Frog to another place in the word to create a new, silly word.
  5. Read the new silly name aloud with your child, saying the sounds of each letter and then the new word. For example, if you get R-O-F-G, say each letter sound with your child — Rr-ah-fff-guh and then read, “rofg.”
    • Ask your child, “What happened to the word Frog?”
    • Discuss with your child why the word no longer says Frog.
    • Show your child how you can move the letter back again to create the word Frog.
    • Then show your child that if you move the same letter to another place in the word, that the word sounds different once again.
    • Discuss the importance of putting letters in a specific order to make a specific word.
  6. Have your child move around the letters of the word Frog again a few times to create more words. Read each new word aloud. After he has created several silly words, work together to make the word Frog again.
  7. When you are done playing, display the magnets on your refrigerator or other magnetic surface in your home.

Variations:

  • Write the name of another WordFriend—like Pig or Ant—and follow steps 2-7 above.
  • Write out a few names and mix them all together (for example, Frog, Pig and Ant). See what silly words you can make by taking a few of the letters together and reading them aloud. Then try moving the letters around to get the names that you started with.

Take It Further:

Say the sound of one of the letters in your child’s name. Try to find things around the house that start with that sound or that have that sound somewhere in them.

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

107A: Who’s Making that Sound?

In “Dog’s Camping Adventure”, Dog learns that when you find out what is making a sound that seems scary, the sound no longer seems that scary. In this fun game, children practice making and guessing animal sounds.

Related Episode:
107
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Listening Skills; Identifying Sounds; Vocabulary and Concept Development.
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • Pieces of paper.
  • Crayons, markers or pencils and/or pictures of animals and glue or pre-made cards with pictures of animals and the name of the animal below or above the picture.

Directions:

Getting Ready:

  1. Make cards out of paper with the name of an animal and a drawing or picture of that animal.
  2. Mix up the cards and put them in a bag.

Playing the Game:

  1. A player pulls a card out of the bag and makes the sound of the animal on the card.
  2. The other player(s) try to guess the animal.
  3. The next player draws another animal out of the bag and makes the sound of that animal. The other player(s) guess the animal.
  4. The game continues until there are no cards left in the bag.

Take It Further:

Animal Sound Hide and Seek. This is a fun hide and seek game using animal sounds. Here’s how to play:

  • One person is “it” and all the other players hide.
  • The person who is “it” makes an animal sound. (For example, he barks like a dog.) The players who are hiding then have to make the same sound or another animal sound.
  • The person who is “it” then tries to find the players. During the game, the person who is “it” can make an animal sound at any time. Whenever the players hear that sound, they then also have to make an animal sound (the same sound that they just heard or another sound). The player who is “it” continues to try to find the players by following their sounds.
  • When a player is found, she then joins the person who is “it” by making animal sounds with him and helping him find the other players by listening to their sounds.
  • The last person found becomes “it”.

Variations: This game can also be played with different categories. Here are some ideas:

  • Find the Letter Sound: The person who is “it” chooses a letter sound (for example, the sound of the first letter of his name). When he makes the letter sound /t/ for the letter T, everyone else responds with the same letter sound. Every time the person who is “it” says the letter sound, everyone has to respond with that letter. This continues until he has found all the players. The next person who is “it” can make the same letter sound or choose a new one.
  • Find the silly sound:In this version, children make up silly sounds to say when playing the game.
  • Find transportation sounds: In this game, players make the sounds of trucks, cars, trains, planes and other methods of transportation.
  • Find the siren: In this version, children make sounds of sirens on police cars, fire engines, ambulances, etc.
  • Blindfolded Version (“Barko-Polo”): Put a blindfold around the person who is “it”. Have everyone stand still and make their sounds. The person who is “it” tries to find the other players by listening to their sounds. (In this version, it is important that the people playing the game stay in one spot to make their sounds, so that the person who is blindfolded can find them).

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

107B: V Freeze Tag

In “V’ is for Vacation”, Duck finds many things that are shaped like the letter V, including a “V” formed by birds flying together. In this game, you and your child can have fun making the letter “V” with your hands, legs and bodies.

Related Episode:
107
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Recognizing the letter V.
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • A piece of paper with the letter “V” written on it.
  • Tape.

Directions:

Note: This game is best with three or more players.

  1. All the players move around the room. One child has the letter V written on a piece of paper taped to her back (or taped to a toy cape or a blanket draped over her shoulders). After a little while, the child with the “V” says, “V Freeze” and all the players freeze by forming the letter “V” with their bodies.
  2. The child with the “V” then goes over to each player one at a time to unfreeze them by tapping their shoulders. Once children are unfrozen, they can continue moving around the room. The last person to be unfrozen becomes “it” and gets the “V”.
  3. In addition to saying “V freeze,” the child with the “V” can say, “group V freeze.” When she says this, everyone has to join together to create one big “V” with their bodies by lying on the ground.

Variation: Try playing this activity with other letters of the alphabet. Have players choose another letter of the alphabet. Write that letter down on a piece of paper and have the person who is “it” tape that to her back. When it is time to freeze, she can say the name of the letter and followed by “freeze” (for example, “O Freeze”, “A freeze”, etc. ) to let children know what letter they need to make when they freeze.

Take It Further:

  • “V” Hide and Seek Make a “V” out of poster board (or other sturdy material). Then take turns hiding and finding the “V” in different places in the house. You and your child can each take turns hiding and finding the “V”. If you have more than two people, one can hide the “V” and the others can find it. When someone finds the “V”, he can say “V, V, I found the V”, to help everyone become familiar with the name of the letter.
  • Going on a “V” Hunt Cut a piece of sturdy paper or poster board into the shape of the letter “V”. Make enough “V”s so that each parent and child has one. Glue each “V” to a popsicle stick or hang the “V” on a thick, sturdy piece of yarn and wear it like a necklace. Use your “V” necklaces/popsicle sticks to remind your child what the letter V looks like on your “V” hunt. Here are some ideas of what you and your child can do on your hunt:• Look for things around the house and outside that are shaped like the letter V-a tree branch, fingers in the “V” shape, a V-neck shirt, designs, etc.
    • Look for things around the house and outside that are shaped like the letter V-a tree branch, fingers in the “V” shape, a V-neck shirt, designs, etc.
    • Look for the letter V in signs and posters in the neighborhood.
    • Look for boxes and labels (of food, etc.) around the house with the letter V in them, such as vitamins, olives, videos, vest, etc.
    • Look for the letter V as you read with your child.
  • V Book Draw the letter V on a piece of cardboard or sturdy paper. Trace that letter onto pieces of paper. Cut out the “V” shapes and staple them together in the upper left-hand corner. On each page, write a word that starts with the letter “V” on one branch of the “V” and a corresponding picture on the other branch. (For example, write the word “vest” on the left side of one of the pages and draw a picture of a vest on the right side of that “V”). Enjoy reading your homemade “V” book.

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

108A: Rhyme Ball

In “Snug as a Bug”, Frog and Bug try to find the word that finishes the rhyme “Snug as a bug in a ____.” They find several “ug” words, before they find the word RUG. In this fun activity you and your child can explore different rhyme words.

Related Episode:
108
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Rhyming.
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • Tape.
  • Cutouts of WordFriends™ Bug and Frog (see Appendix).
  • One shoebox without a lid (or other small open box or bucket).
  • Ball (which can fit into the box or bucket).

Directions:

  1. Tape the BUG WordFriend to the inside of the box.
  2. Place the box on its side so that the opening and the WordFriend face you and your child.
  3. Take the ball and stand a few feet away from the box with your child.
  4. Place the ball on the ground in front of you.
  5. Start the game by saying the word “Bug”. Once you have said the word, push or kick the ball a little in the direction of the open box.
  6. Then take turns saying words that rhyme with Bug.Here are some ideas: hug, dug, mug, jug, tug, rug, slug, snug
    For this game, it is also fine to come up with silly words, such as gug, sug and wug.
  7. Every time someone says a rhyming word, push or kick the ball one more time.
  8. Keep going until you have successfully gotten the ball into the box.Note: If you run out of words, before the ball goes in the box, repeat some of the words until the ball goes in the box.
  9. Try playing the game with the Frog WordFriend. Take the Bug WordFriend away and tape the Frog WordFriend to the box. Repeat steps 2- 8. Here are some ideas for rhyming words:
    • Words that rhyme with Frog: fog, log, dog, hog, jog.

Take It Further:

  • Build a WordThing Build a WordThing™ – Have your child make a WordThing with his or her favorite “ug” word. Write a word with “ug” in it, like “bug,” “rug” or “jug” in big letters on a piece of construction paper or cardboard. Then have your child turn the word into a WordThing by drawing an outline of the object’s shape around it and decorating it by drawing, painting and/or pasting on objects (like pom poms, pipe cleaners, googly eyes, etc.).
  • My very own UG Book In this activity you and your child can create your own book with words that rhyme with Bug. Brainstorm with your child several words that rhyme with Bug (e.g. mug, jug, slug, etc. . .). Write each word on a separate piece of paper. When possible, use images to show what the words mean (using magazine cut-outs, drawings, or photographs). Take a photo of you giving your child a hug, and make it the last page in your book. Create a cover for your “UG” book. Help your child staple all the pages together or punch a hole in the top left hand corner of each page and tie the pages together with yarn. Then read your new book with your child.
  • Build a Word! Create several copies of large letters: “R” “U” and “G.” Recite the lyrics to the Build a Word song with your child:”It’s time to Build a Word. Let’s build it. Let’s build it now!”
    “Yeah, we just built a word. We built it. We built it.” Then practice each letter in the word ‘RUG’ and practice the sounds /r/ /u/ /g/ to make “RUG.” Emphasize the blending of the three sounds to make the word.
    Next, give your child the letter sheets: R, U, G. Work together with your child to build the word RUG by laying the letter cutouts together.
  • Snug as a Bug Storybook After watching the Snug in BUG episode, you can make your own book telling the story as you remember it. You could say, “Do you remember the story we saw? First Bug had trouble falling asleep. Then he tried to sleep in a Mug and then a Jug. With the help of his WordFriends, he finally built a snug Rug where he comfortably fell asleep. In your book, you will tell the story you remember seeing today. I can help you with the words you want to write. You can draw any pictures you like to go with your story.”Have your child draw pictures to tell the story as she remembers it. Suggest that she draw pictures from two or three scenes in the story.
    Perhaps pictures of:
    • Bug in a Mug
    • Bug in a Jug
    • Bug in the Rug
  • For children who can write themselves or who are interested in experimenting with text, encourage them to practice “writing” their own words.
  • Other “R” words, “U” words, and “G” words Create visual images of the letters R, U, and G. Create visual images of multiple things that start with R, U, and G, either by using magazine cutouts or drawings. Tell your child, “Did you know that if you listen carefully to the sounds in a word, you can hear the sounds that the letters make? We are going to play a game with those sounds to see if we can make new words.” Hold up a picture of the letter “R” and say: “Did you know that every letter has a shape, a name, and a sound? What is the name of this letter?” This letter “R” has the sound /r/.” Show your child some pictures of things that start with R. Hold up the pictures of things beginning with the letter “R” one at a time and have your child name the objects, pointing out the /r/ sound. Ask them to brainstorm other words that start with R. Repeat using the letters “U” and “G”.

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

108B: Two Words Become One

In “Nightlight”, the WordFriends™ put two words “night” and “light” together to make a “nightlight”. In this fun activity, you and your child can explore hidden words inside of words and create new words by putting two words together.

Related Episode:
108
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Understanding Compound Words.
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • Pieces of paper.
  • Crayons, markers or pencils.

Directions:

  1. Think about some compound words (words made up of two smaller words) that might interest your child. Here are some examples:
    toothbrush (tooth + brush)                     birthday (birth + day)
    schoolyard (school + yard)                     bathtub (bath + tub)
    nightlight (night + light)                           bookmark (book + mark)
    daytime (day + time)                                earring (ear + ring)
    shoebox (shoe + box)                              postman (post + man)
  2. Say each compound word out loud (for example, “toothbrush”). Tell your child that there are two words hidden in that word. Ask your child to listen closely and see if he can find the two words (for example, the words “tooth” and “brush”).
  3. Draw or cut out and paste pictures of each smaller word (for example, “tooth” and “brush”) on a separate piece of paper. Write the word below its picture.
  4. Take the word/picture cards and use them to practice building bigger words with your child. For example: Pick up the “tooth” card and say, “What’s this?” Then pick up the “brush” card and say, “What’s this?” Once your child has said “tooth” and “brush”, ask your child to put the two words side by side. Then have your child say the words one at a time “tooth…brush” and then together: “toothbrush.” Point out the fact that he has made the word “toothbrush.” Discuss the relationship between the two words–the new word is a type of brush that is used on your tooth. Then draw or cut out and paste a picture of the word “toothbrush” on a separate sheet of paper. Write the word “toothbrush” below its picture.
  5. Repeat steps 1-5 with other compound words.

Take It Further:

Build a WordThing™ Write a compound word, like “bathtub”, in big letters on a piece of construction paper or cardboard. Then have your child turn the word into a WordThing by drawing an outline of the object’s shape (a bathtub) around it and decorating it.

With A Group:

Making New Words Use the word cards from the “Two Words Become One” activity for this game:

  1. Place all of the compound words (like “nightlight) in front of you with the picture side facing up. Place all of the other words (like “night” and “light”) in a bag and mix them up.
  2. Pick a card from the bag and put it face up on the playing surface. Take turns doing this with your child.
  3. If a player picks out a word that can make a real compound word with one of the words that have already been picked, he can say, “It’s time to build a word. Let’s build it. Let’s build it now!” He then puts the two words together. For example, if one player pulls out the word “night”, he puts it down, face up, for all to see. If another player then pulls out the word “light”, he says, it’s time to build a word and puts the two words together to create “nightlight”. Everyone says each word out loud as the player puts them together. Then all players say the new word and applaud the fact that they have built a compound word. The player who picked the last word (for example, light) then puts the compound word (nightlight) and the two words that form that word (night and light) in his pile.
  4. The game continues until all of the words have been used.

Appendix:

Episode

109A: Making Bedtime “Mobile”

In “Duck’s First Sleepover”, Duck learns that different WordFriends™ prefer different sleeping environments. This fun activity helps you and your child explore vocabulary related to “sleep”.

Related Episode:
109
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Identifying places to sleep; Matching letters/words to pictures; Writing letters; Cutting, gluing, tying knots.
Subjects:
Language, literacy, art, fine motor

Materials:

  • Pictures of places that people and animals sleep (drawn or found in magazines, newspapers, etc…).
  • Construction paper.
  • Scissors.
  • Glue.
  • Colored pencils.
  • Plastic hangers.
  • Hole puncher.
  • Pieces of string varying from 2-6 inches in length.

Directions:

  1. Talk with your child about the different places that people sleep (e.g. in a bed, tent, sleeping bag or hammock). Recall books, television shows, and visits to other places to get ideas. Keep a list.
  2. Talk with them about the different places that animals sleep (e.g. in a nest, hayloft, doghouse or burrow), and how these places differ from where people sleep. Keep a list.
  3. Choose several items from either list. Draw small pictures of them and/or cut out pictures from magazines.
  4. Glue the pictures onto differently colored construction paper pieces (for durability).
  5. Write the word of the item under the picture, or have your child copy the word.
  6. Punch a hole through the top of the construction paper pieces.
  7. Attach each piece to the hanger with string.
  8. Hang your mobile up for everyone to admire!

Variation: Create two separate mobiles–one for places people sleep and one for animals. Or create mobiles for other categories (food, clothing, toys) and for the letters in your child’s name.

Take It Further:

  • Identify the first sound/letter in each of the words of the pictures on your mobile. Then ask your child how many they can remember.
  • When you watch WordWorld with your child, play “I Spy” and look to see how many places you can find that the characters sleep in an episode.
  • Next time you go shopping with your child, stop in mattress stores, camping stores and pet stores to see different places to sleep.

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

109B: Make a Hat WordThing™

Sheep, the magician, loses her Hat, and it goes flying around WordWorld. Unfortunately, it breaks apart and Sheep’s WordFriends™ must help her put it back together again. In this fun activity, you and your child can put together your own hats.

Related Episode:
109
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Recognizing the same word in different contexts.
Subjects:
Literacy and language development

Materials:

  • Cutout of the letter H.
  • Cutout of the letter A.
  • Cutout of the letter T.
  • Strip of paper (must fit around child’s head).
  • Tape or stapler.

Directions:

  1. Practice each letter name in the word hat and then practice the sounds /h/ /a/ /t/ to make hat. Emphasize the blending of the three sounds to make the word.
  2. Lay the letters down on a table in the appropriate order to build hat.
  3. Once the word has been “built”, say the word hat, emphasizing the sound each letter makes.
  4. Feel free to let your child color and decorate the letters.
  5. Tape or staple the letters to the strip of paper in the correct order. Then, form the piece of paper into a circle to fit around the child’s head. Secure the ends.
  6. Now, your child has his/her own hat WordThing!

Take It Further:

Build a WordThing Have your child identify different kinds of hats. Draw pictures of the various types together. How are they similar? How are they different? Write the word hat on all of the different pictures to build greater word recognition.

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

110B: Let’s “Flip” Out on Rhymes!

In “Pig’s Big Moonlight Feast”, Pig is too sick to cook, so his WordFriends™ use rhyming to prepare the feast. This creative activity helps you and your child explore how words that end with the same sound are words that rhyme.

Related Episode:
110
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Identifying words that rhyme; Matching words to pictures; Writing letters.
Subjects:
Language, literacy, art, fine motor

Materials:

  • Construction paper.
  • Scissors.
  • Crayons.
  • Stapler or
  • “O” rings and hole puncher.

Directions:

  1. Talk with your child about how some words sound the same at the end and that these are called rhyming words. Explain that words that rhyme are in the same word family.
  2. Give them some examples. You can use the words that rhyme in the episode: cake and rake, pie and tie, corn and horn. Write them down so they can see the similarities as well as hear them.
  3. Cut a rectangle of construction paper approximately 3″ X 6″. Then cut 2-3 smaller pieces of paper approximately 1-1/2″ X 3″.
  4. List 3-4 words in the “ake” word family: cake, rake, take, make, etc.
  5. Write the first word (e.g. cake) on the larger piece of paper, spreading the letters out as evenly as possible. Encourage your child to write the letters if possible by tracing or copying them.
  6. Then, write the first letter of the other words (e.g. “r” for rake, “t” for take and “m” for make) on the smaller pieces of paper.
  7. Attach the smaller letter pieces over the “c” of cake by stapling them one on top of each other. Or you can punch holes through the top of smaller pieces and connect them to the larger piece with a small metal “O” ring.
  8. Read the top word with your child. As you turn over each of the smaller pieces with a different first letter, notice how changing just the first letter makes a whole new word.
  9. Share your book with family and friends!

Variation: Create more flip books with different word families. You can use words that have blends (st, try, pl) at the beginning of the words instead of one letter.

Take It Further:

  • Draw or find pictures that match the different words in the word family. Match these up to each word as you turn the pages.
  • Play rhyming games with your child as you wait in line at the store. Look around and encourage them to think of rhyming words with something you see or hear.
  • Try to think of words that rhyme with your child’s name. Make up nonsense words if you can–they are even more fun then real words!

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

111A: Musical Rhyme Time!

In “Boppin’ With the Bug Band”, Frog helps the Bug band use rhyming words with their music. In this lively activity, your child can pair music with rhyming words too!

Related Episode:
111
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Identifying/matching rhyming words; Writing letters.
Subjects:
Language, literacy, movement

Materials:

  • 10 – 12 sheets of 8-1/2″ x 11″ paper.
  • Crayons.
  • Music.

Directions:

  1. Explain to your child that when words sound the same at the end, they rhyme.Variation: Listen to several of your child’s favorite songs. (Choose songs that use rhyming words.) Notice the rhyming words and write them down. Explain that many songs do use rhymes, and this makes the songs lots of fun and easy to remember.
  2. Write down pairs of rhyming words on separate sheets of 8-1/2″ x 11″ paper. The letters of the words should be large enough to read from a small distance. You can use rhymes from the episode (e.g. house – mouse, bell – well, bug – jug, etc.). or create your own. Choose simple words that look alike as well as sound alike (e.g. bell – well, stink -think, cat – hat, fish – dish, house – mouse, boat – goat, etc.). Encourage your child to write the words by copying or tracing them.
  3. Invite friends over to play a musical rhyme matching game. Make sure you have enough words for each child.
  4. Place the words face down in a long line. Make sure the rhyming pairs are not next to each other and that the children do not know which word is which.
  5. As you play some of their favorite music, have the children walk around the words, just like in musical chairs.
  6. When the music stops, each child stops and picks up the word closest to them. They should read the word (with adult help if necessary) and find the child with the word that rhymes with their word. Each partnership should read their words to each other to check that they rhyme.
  7. Place the words face down again, mix them up, and play again!

Variation: For younger children, match upper and lowercase letters instead of words.

Take It Further:

  • For stronger readers, you can use words with more syllables, rhyming words that do not look alike, homonyms (words with same spelling or sound, there -their), homophones (words with same pronunciation, eye – I), or antonyms (words with opposite meaning, hot – cold).
  • Play a concentration matching game with the words.

With A Group:

Appendix:

Episode

113A: Look at My Book

In “Radio Read-a-Thon”, Duck has to read his favorite book on the radio, remembering the story through the pictures. “LOOK BOOKS” are great to encourage your child to read in this way, even if they cannot yet read words.

Related Episode:
113
Age Range: 
3-5
Skills:
Identifying letters OOK; Reading favorite stories through pictures; Writing letters.
Subjects:
Language, literacy, art, fine motor

Materials:

  • 3-5 half-sheets of paper.
  • 2 pieces of construction paper the same size.
  • Crayons.
  • Stapler or
  • Hole puncher and yarn.

Directions:

  1. Talk with your child about the different ways we read books. Sometimes we read the words, sometimes we know the story from memory, and sometimes we use pictures to tell the story. Books that we read from by looking at the pictures are called “LOOK BOOKS”.
  2. Have your child choose her favorite book. Sit and read it with her, focusing on the pictures. Then have her go back and retell the story using just the pictures.
  3. Either using that story, or one you make up together, ask your child to draw 3-5 scenes, each on a separate piece of paper.
  4. Take a piece of construction paper and help your child copy or trace the words “LOOK BOOK”. Make sure the letters are big. Notice that these words both end in OOK and that they rhyme.
  5. Cut out the OO’s in the two words LOOK and BOOK. This way your child can peek inside her book. Decorate the construction paper any way you like. This will be the cover of your LOOK BOOK.
  6. Take another piece of construction paper (same size) and sandwich the inner pages of your book between the two pieces of construction paper. Staple or punch holes through the left side of the book so you can sew the book together with yarn.
  7. Read your LOOK BOOK together and share it with others!

Variation: Staple or sew both sides of your book together. Cut a line down the middle of the front cover to make a shutter book.

Take It Further:

  • Once you’ve made your LOOK BOOK, ask your child to retell the story while you write it down. Attach this dictation inside the book so you can go back and reread it with them later on.
  • Create other LOOK BOOKS that display one picture on a page with the word written under it. This way your child can “read” words through pictures.
  • Have your read their book to family or friends over the phone–just like on the radio!

With A Group:

Appendix: